Greetings from Washington, DC post card


Reunion Hotel Information

Washington, DC - 2021

First day of Reunion Tours

NOTE: WE WILL HAVE TO SHOW ID's AND PASS THROUGH SECURITY INCLUDING METAL DETECTORS TO VISIT MOST FEDERAL FACILITIES ON OUR TOURS.  ANY METAL ITEMS SHOULD BE LEFT AT THE HOTEL OR ON THE BUS.  FOLLOW THIS LINK TO A LIST OF PROHIBITED ITEMS FOR THE CAPITOL BUILDING.  SOME OF THE ITEMS ARE OBVIOUS BUT SOME ARE NOT SUCH AS LIQUIDS INCLUDING WATER.  THIS LIST SHOULD BE A GOOD GUIDE FOR MOST FEDERAL FACILITIES.



First day of Tours   $ TBD,  9:30 AM Departure to The US Marine Corps Museum and Mount Vernon

Our luxurious motor coachAt 9:30 AM our luxurious air conditioned motor coach departs our hotel to whisk us to The US Marine Corps Museum. It is the historical museum of the United States Marine Corps. Located in Triangle, Virginia near MCB Quantico, the museum opened on November 10, 2006,WWII National Museum and is now one of the top tourist attractions in the state, drawing over 500,000 people annually.  In July 2013, the museum announced plans for a major expansion, to include sections onWWII National Museum more modern Marine Corps history, such as the 1983 Beirut barracks bombing, a combat art gallery, and a war on terror gallery.  Designed by Curtis W. Fentress of Fentress Architects, the museum's exterior is meant to "evoke the image of the flag raisers of Iwo Jima," an image that is also preserved by the Marine Corps War Memorial.

The museum features the following permanent exhibits, which were designed by Christopher Chadbourne and Associates: Leatherneck Gallery, Legacy Walk, Making Marines, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War,  On June 5, 2010, the following three exhibits were opened: Defending a New Nation (1775–1865) Age of Expansion (1866–1916) World War I (1917–1918)  It also has a statue of a horse, Sergeant Reckless, which served with the Marine Corps in Korea. The statue was dedicated on Friday, 26 July 2013.  The Korean War gallery features a section that simulates the cold temperature and sounds of the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir in 1951, while the war's fighting was at its peak.

Lunch is on your own at either of two museum eateries.  The Devil Dog diner, a cafeteria-style restaurant that honors Marine mess operations.  The menu includes a varied and tempting selection of grab and go items, homemade soups and chili, freshly baked pizza, hot sandwiches and salad bar. In addition, guests can select from an assortment of beverages and snacks.   Or you could chose Tun Tavern.  Legend has it that the Marine Corps was founded in 1775 at the original Tun Tavern in Philadelphia.  The décor of Tun Tavern is the style of a colonial era tavern, and features a large painting depicting famous Marines from the founding of the Corps to the present day.  Tun Tavern offers a full lunch menu and alcoholic beverage service.





After lunch we will visit Mount Vernon, the home of George Washington. Mount VernonThe building began as a one and one-half story house built in 1734 by George Washington's father, Augustine Washington.  George Washington began running Mount Vernon in 1754, and over the next 45 years slowly enlarged the dwelling to create the 21-room residence we see today.  Washington oversaw each renovation, advising on design, construction, and decoration, despite being away much of the time.

The principal block, dating from about 1734, was a one story house with a garret.  In the 1750s, the roof was raised to a full second story and a third floor garret.  There were also one-story extension added to the north and south ends of the house, these would be torn down during the next building phase.  The present day mansion is 11,028 sq ft.George Washington

Following Washington's death in 1799, under the The Blue Room, Mount Vernonownership of several successive generations of the family, the estate progressively declined as revenues were insufficient to maintain it adequately.  In 1858, the house's historical importance was recognized and it was saved from ruin by the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association.  This philanthropic organization acquired it together with part of the Washington property estate.  Escaping the damage suffered by many plantation houses during the American Civil War, Mount Vernon was restored.  Mount Vernon was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960 and is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  It is still owned and maintained in trust by the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association.

On December 12, 1799, Washington spent several hours riding over the plantation, in snow, hail and freezing rain.  He ate his supper later that evening without changing from his wet clothes.  The following day, he awoke with a severe sore throat (either quinsy or acute epiglottitis) and became increasingly hoarse as the day progressed.  All the available medical treatments failed to improve his condition, and he died at Mount Vernon at around 10pm on Saturday, December 14, 1799, aged 67.  In accordance with his will, Washington was entombed in a family crypt he had built upon first inheriting the estate.  It was in disrepair by 1799, so Washington's will also requested that a new, larger tomb be built.  This was not executed until 1831, the centennial of his birth.  The need for a new tomb was confirmed when an unsuccessful attempt was made to steal his skull!  In 1830, John Augustine Washington II, then proprietor of Mount Vernon, fired one of the estate's gardeners, whose name is now unknown.  Out of revenge, the unemployed gardener broke into the crypt with the intent of stealing George Washington's skull.  However, the gardener inadvertently absconded with the skull of one of the Blackburns, who were in-laws of George Washington's nephew, Judge Bushrod Washington.  The extremely dilapidated state of the tomb reportedly contributed to the gardener's confusion.  The desecration of the burial site prompted a new, more secure, burial vault to be constructed.





See Page 2 for next 2 day's events events




Great Area Atttractions

Return to Reunions Page